Winter Tire Tips

Do You Need Winter Tires? You know it’s coming. Snow and slush. Freezing rain. Maybe even black ice. But do you know if your tires are ready for all of that? When driving in New Hampshire in the wintertime, your tires just might be the most important safety feature on your car. The right ones can get you to your destination safely. The wrong ones? Well, just look over in the ditch during the next storm. So how do you figure out what’s best for your vehicle? Here are five things to know about winter tires: 1.Winter tires really are different than regular tires. Winter tires have deeper tread, along with siping (slits in the tread blocks). This increases the number of edges that touch the road, resulting in better traction and handling. They also stay softer than other tires do in cold weather, thanks to special rubber compounds designed specifically for winter use. That helps increase traction as well.  2. If your area regularly drops below 45 degrees, you probably need winter tires. Winter tires don’t just perform better in snow and ice. They are better for cold weather in general. So if you get some chilly days where you live, consider a set – a full set. Installing just two winter tires can cause handling problems. 3.There are two main categories. Studless snow and ice tires are designed for extreme conditions. They are better in deep snow than performance winter tires, which are for light snow and ice. What about studded tires? Well, they give you great traction on ice but also damage roads. And some experts...

7 Simple Snow Shoveling Safety Tips

Shovel snow safely this winter Winter is quickly approaching, and with it comes many traditions and activities: holiday celebrations with loved ones, skiing and snowboarding outings in the mountains, fireplace-lit living rooms, homemade batches of soup, and – unfortunately for many of us – shoveling snow. Living in New Hampshire when snow storms hit and your driveway and walkways are covered with the cold white stuff, you might want to just stay inside. But if your work and personal commitments make that impossible, you’ll need to first dig out the snow shovel – or make sure it’s handy before the snow flies! For many people across NH, snow shoveling will be both a reality and a necessity this winter. At Knapton, Reade & Woods, we want to ensure that your efforts will get you on your way while also keeping you safe, so here are seven simple snow shoveling safety tips provided by the Boston Herald. Warm-up! Never jump right into an activity. Start by cleaning off your car. Place your hands a good distance apart on the shovel – it helps with leverage. Never bend at your waist. Push the snow when you can. Scoop smaller loads of snow. Use your legs, core and arms to help scoop and throw snow. Always step in the direction you throw snow to avoid excessive twisting on your lower back. At Knapton, Reade& Woods, your safety is important to us. For additional safety tips and other valuable resources, please read our blog, or visit us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Google+....

6 Snow Plow Safety Tips

Snow plow safety is a priority here in New Hampshire, given the significant amount of snowfall that must be cleared from the roads each winter. Even for the experienced driver, safely maneuvering a snow plow vehicle is a challenging job. If you are plowing this winter, use the following snow plow safety tips from MMG Insurance to keep yourself and everyone else on the roads safe this winter: Get adequate sleep – many times a snow plow operator must be ready to get started without much notice. Getting adequate sleep plays an essential role in safe vehicle operation. Understand all necessary operating procedures – make certain that you understand how each portion of the plowing equipment operates; always check to be sure all lights and signals are operating correctly before plowing. Keep the salt spreading machinery clean – to properly dispense road salt and sand materials, as well as to lengthen the life of your equipment, keep the salt spreader and other machinery clean and free of obstructions. Perform a head check – although side and rear-view mirrors supply some visual assistance, it’s best to turn around and look out the side or rear window when making lane changes, executing a turn, or backing up. Acquaint yourself with your surroundings in advance – familiarizing yourself with the grounds before the snow accumulates helps you ensure that you plow the proper areas, limiting unintended damage to property and/or landscaping on the premises. Plow during low traffic hours – if conditions permit, it’s safest to operate a snow plow vehicle when there is little to no traffic. When high winds, low...