9 Simple Firework Safety Tips

For most of us, the Fourth of July is a time to enjoy the company of family and friends, having fun and creating memories – whether at home or away. But for some families, the holiday is a nightmare. Homes each year in New Hampshire are damaged by wayward fireworks and thousands of people are injured in accidents. At Knapton, Reade & Woods Insurance Agency, we want your holiday to be happy, but also safe. Keep the following firework safety tips in mind to help you protect yourself and your property on Independence Day: Protecting yourself (and others) To minimize the risk of injury, don’t use consumer fireworks; attend a public display conducted by professionals in your town/city instead. If using consumer fireworks, always follow instructions. Do not attempt to re-light “duds” or create homemade fireworks. Never let children handle or light fireworks. Even sparklers, which burn at more than 1,000 degrees, can cause third-degree burns. Kids under the age of 15 account for approximately 40 percent of fireworks injuries, according to the U.S. Fire Administration. A responsible adult should always be present when children – even teenagers – are around fireworks. More than half of fireworks injuries happen to those younger than 20 years old. Protecting your home According to the National Fire Protection Association, the best way to protect your home is to not use fireworks at home. Remember, fireworks can cause grass fires and other types of blazes as well. Make sure you light fireworks in a safe area, away from homes and buildings, as well as other combustible material. Keep a fire extinguisher nearby in...

Grilling Safety Tips

Just like hamburgers and hot dogs, a sizzling grill is a symbol of summer, and grilling isn’t just about great food – backyard barbecues often create treasured memories with friends and family. However, it’s important to keep in mind that when you grill, you’re literally playing with fire. Thousands of residents each year learn this the hard way, suffering damage to their homes or even serious injuries in grilling accidents. Review the simple tips below to help ensure that you and everyone you’re cooking for remain safe next time you fire up the grill. Safety Tips for All Grills • Regardless of whether it’s gas or charcoal, your grill should be on a level surface outdoors, away from anything that could be ignited by flames (bushes, fences, etc.). • NEVER use a grill indoors. Odorless carbon monoxide fumes can be fatal. • Keep your grill clean and well-maintained. Check parts regularly to determine if replacements are needed. • Never leave a hot grill unattended or let children play near it. Charcoal Grill Tips From Kingsford.com • Do not add lighter fluid directly to hot coals; the flame could travel up the stream of fluid and burn you. • Never use gasoline or kerosene to light a charcoal fire. • Use flame-retardant mitts and long-handled barbecue tongs, as coals can reach up to 1,000 degrees. • To dispose of coals, allow the ashes to cool for at least 48 hours before disposal in a non-combustible container. If you cannot wait 48 hours, carefully place coals individually in a can of sand or bucket of water. Gas Grill Safety Tips From...

5 Fishing Safety Tips

Many New Hampshire residents look forward to fishing on our state’s various lakes, ponds, and rivers, especially when the warm weather arrives, and one of the best ways to enjoy boating and fishing is to share the fun with others – especially your kids or grand kids. Although expert anglers typically know the ropes of both boating and fishing in New Hampshire, there are still many mishaps that can occur if the excursion is not well-planned, especially when you have little ones along for the ride. The next time you’re gearing up with your loved ones to go after the “big one,” make sure that it’s as enjoyable as you anticipate by keeping the following five fishing safety tips provided by Safeco Insurance in mind: 1. Only fish if weather permits. Check the weather forecast in detail before you head out onto the water. Here in New Hampshire, the weather can change quickly and drastically, ushering in unexpected storms that could scare your children and put you all in harm’s way. 2. Dress yourself – and your little ones – for the adventure. Although it may seem obvious, it can get slippery out on the boat or the dock! Ensure stable footing for all by making sure you and your kids are wearing shoes that will grip boat floors and slick rocks and docks. 3. Make safety a game. It’s important to be equipped with everything you need for safety and protection – from flashlights and sunscreen to plenty of water and life preservers – but you can also make it fun for the kids. For example, make them...

6 Boating Safety Tips

Keep Safety in Mind as Boating Season Begins Unfortunately, every summer includes fun weekends on the water that take a turn for the worse when accidents occur. Often, these accidents on the water could have been prevented with just a few simple precautions. Don’t let an accident ruin your fun; keep the following boating safety tips from our partners at Safeco Insurance in mind as boating season begins: Life Preservers Aren’t Only for Kids. Don’t just have life jackets on board — wear them! When an accident occurs, people rarely have time to reach for a life jacket and put it on. This rule applies to adults, not just children. More people in their 30s die in boating accidents than any other age group. Life vests have evolved greatly over the years; today, you can even get vests for your water-loving dog! Watch the Back of the Boat. Carbon monoxide kills in minutes, so be sure to tell your passengers where your exhaust pipes are located, turn off your engine when people are in the water, and don’t let passengers “ski” or “teak-surf” by holding on to the back of the boat. Both Washington and Oregon made teak-surfing illegal in the last few years, after several tragic deaths occurred. Carbon monoxide detectors are standard on most new boats, and older boats install devices for less than $100. Alcohol and Boating Don’t Mix. More than 50 percent of drowning accidents result from a dangerous combination of boating and alcohol. Just as you should never drink and drive, don’t ever operate your boat after ingesting alcoholic beverages. Boats Need TLC Too....

Summer Safety Tips: Pool, Extreme Heat, & Road Trip Safety

For many New Hampshire residents, summer is a highly anticipated time to enjoy fun in the sun with friends and family. However, the summer season poses a unique set of risks, from heat exhaustion and heat stroke to pool-related accidents and injuries. Keep the following safety tips in mind throughout the summer to ensure that in addition to fun, this season remains as safe and healthy as possible. Pool Safety Tips Did you know that drowning is the second leading cause of unintentional injury-related death among children under age 14, and that the majority of drownings involving 1 to 4-year-olds occur in home swimming pools? Although it’s an unsettling thought, it’s important to realize how quickly accidents can happen in and around a pool. Young children can drown in less than two inches of water, and these accidents can occur in just a matter of minutes. Review the following pool safety tips to help keep you, your loved ones, and your guests safe in your pool this summer: Install a fence around all sides of your pool that measures at least 4-feet tall. Your pool gates should also be high enough so that they are out of the reach of children. It’s best to have self-closing and self-latching gates. Never leave children unsupervised in or around your pool, even for a moment. Do not use “floaties” or other types of inflatable swimming aids as a substitute for certified life vests. Be sure to keep rescue equipment, namely a life preserver and a shepherd’s hook, along with a telephone, nearby your pool. Ideally, anyone who is supervising children poolside should...